A Guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), with a pictorial key

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Departments of Plant Pathology and Genetics, North Carolina State University, U.S. Agency for International Development , Raleigh, N.C, [Washington]
Meloidogyne -- Identification, Nematoda -- Identific
StatementJ.D. Eisenback ... [et al.].
ContributionsEisenback, J. D., International Meloidogyne Project.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL391.N4 G79 1981
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 48 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3925876M
LC Control Number81623783

PDF | On Jan 1,J. EIsenback and others published A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes. | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate.

PDF | On Jan 1,J D Eisenback and others published A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), With A Pictorial Key |. Guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), with a pictorial key. Raleigh, N.C.: Departments of Plant Pathology and Genetics, North Carolina State University ; [Washington]: U.S.

Agency for International Development, [] (OCoLC) Material Type. A guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) with a pictorial key. Abstract This is a useful practical guide to recognition of the four economically most important species of root-knot nematodes -- M.

incognita, M. javanica, M. arenaria and M. hapla. This is a useful practical guide to recognition of the four economically most important species of root-knot nematodes -- M. incognita, M.

javanica, M. arenaria and M. hapla. A profusely illustrated text and the pictorial key should be of much value to taxonomists, teachers and field workers. Part 1 deals with various taxonomic approaches to the identification of Meloidogyne spp., including Cited by: Root-knot nematodes occur worldwide, affecting thousands of different plants.

As mentioned earlier, several species attack tomatoes. The Solanaceae appears to be a universal host for many of these microscopic worms. Meloidogyne are by far the most common and most damaging on tomatoes. They cause serious crop losses in many countries, both in.

This book provides an overview (chapter 1) of the general biology, ecology and economic importance of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), and covers in detail the following: general morphology (chapter 2); taxonomy, identification and principal species (chapter 3); biochemical and molecular identification (chapter 4); molecular taxonomy and phylogeny (chapter 5); hatch and host location.

Nematodes are microscopic, non-segmented roundworms. Many nematode species are found in soils, but relatively few can cause plant diseases. Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are the most important and most economically devastating nematodes on North Carolina, southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) is the most common species, yet the newly.

SPECIES OF ROOT-KNOT NEMATODES Meloidogyne hapla — Northern root-knot nematode This is the most common root-knot nematode found in Illinois and other northern soils. Unlike most other root-knot nematode species, M.

hapla withstands freezing temperatures, thereby allowing it to survive cold northern winters outdoors. A guide for the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), with a pictorial key.

International Meloidogyne Project, Raleigh, USA, 48 p. IFCS Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are economically important plant parasites affecting a broad range of host plants, and thus far 95 nominal species have been Junea root-knot nematode (RKN) was discovered on roots of a traveler's tree (Ravenala madagascariensis Sonnerat) that was intended for exhibit at a public garden in Pennsylvania.

Root-Knot Nematodes: There are four species of root-knot nematodes known to be a problem in potato production in the U.S.

The most important is the Columbia Root-Knot Nematode. It is only known to be present in the Pacific West, Moun-tain West and West South Central Regions. The Southern, Javanese and Northern Root-Knot. Meloidogyne arenaria is a species of plant pathogenic nematode is also known as the peanut root knot word "Meloidogyne" is derived from two Greek words that mean "apple-shaped" and "female".The peanut root knot nematode, M.

arenaria is one of the "major" Meloidogyne species because of its worldwide economic importance. arenaria is a predominant nematode species. The species of greatest concern to vegetable growers in the region is the Northern Root Knot Nematode (NRKN), Meloidogyne hapla.

Unlike the Southern Root Knot Nematode (M. incognita) and a few other species found primarily in the southern US, NRKN is capable of surviving the freezing temperatures of northern winters.

As you study this guide, note that four different species of root-knot nematodes are present in Georgia, each with a different host range. Of these, southern, peanut and Javanese are the most impor-tant. The Extension Nematology Laboratory will identify root-knot nematode species.

Approximately species of this nematode have been identified world-wide, but the two most commonly found in Kentucky are the southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and the northern root-knot nematode (M.

hapla). Female root-knot nematodes deposit eggs in a gelatinous mass at or near the root surface. A worm. Root-knot nematodes survive the winter as eggs in the soil.

Like insects, root-knot nematodes have several juvenile stages and the nematodes molt (i.e., shed their outer layers) as they grow.

The second juvenile stage of root-knot nematode is the most important, because at this stage the nematode seeks out and infects plant roots. A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne sp.) With a Pictorial Key. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC., pp: Gul, A.

and M. Saeed, A survey of root -knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in the North.

Download A Guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), with a pictorial key PDF

Root-knot nematodes are the most economically important group of plant-parasitic nematodes worldwide, and their control presents a major global challenge.

Please read our short guide how to send a book to Kindle. Save for later species incognita knot soil resistance nematology host journal soil-inhabiting nematodes, otherwise known as eelworms, of the genus.

Meloidogyne. These nematodes burrow into the soft tissues of young root tips, and cause the nearby root cells to divide and enlarge. Four different species of.

Details A Guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), with a pictorial key FB2

Meloidogyne. are common in New South Wales: M. javanica. incognita. hapla. and. arenaria. Symptoms. A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes. A cooperative publication of the Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University and the United States Agency for International Development.

Raleigh: North Carolina State Graphics. Root-knot nematodes are one of the three most economically damaging genera of plant-parasitic nematodes on horticultural and field crops. Root-knot nematodes are very small and they parasitic the roots of thousands of plant species, including monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous, herbaceous and woody plants.

Root-knot nematode: Important nematode parasite. In: Kinloch RA, Barker KR, Pederson GA, Windham GL, editor. Plant and Nematode Interactions. USA: ASA, CSSA, SSA, Publishers. Eisenback JD, Hirschmann H, Sasser JN, and Triantaphyllou HH. A Guide to the Most Common Species of Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne species), with a Pictorial Key.

Economic impact. Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are one of the three most economically damaging genera of plant-parasitic nematodes on horticultural and field -knot nematodes are distributed worldwide, and are obligate parasites of the roots of thousands of plant species, including monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous, herbaceous and woody plants.

Root-Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne Species) H., Sasser, J.N. and Triantaphyllou, A.C. () A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), with a Pictorial Key. State University, Department of Plant Pathology and Genetics, Raleigh, North Carolina.

A Guide to the Four Most Common Species of Root-Knot Nematodes, (Meloidogyne species) with a pictorial key. A Coop. Publ.

Description A Guide to the four most common species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Spp.), with a pictorial key FB2

Depts. Plant Pathol. and Genetics and U.S. Agency for International Development, Raleigh, NC. Eisenback, J.D. and aphyllou. Root-knot nematodes: Meloidogyne species and races. Crop Rotation – a three or four year rotation program with resistant crops is an effective program.

Most of the cereal crops are fairly resistant. Resistant or Tolerant Varieties – Some vegetable and field crop varieties have resistance to root knot nematodes, and are advertised as such. Reaction of several ornamental plants is given in a.

With the different species of root-knot nematodes, they can affect a wide array of plants. In most instances, however, one plant will only host a single type of nematode. Their common hosts include fruits, vegetables, ornamental plants, landscape plants. other species like root-knot, young larval stages will invade root tissue, establishing permanent feeding sites within the root.

Second stage larvae will then molt 3 times to become adult male or female. For most species of nematodes, as many as 50– eggs are produced per female, while in others such as root-knot, upwards of may be. The root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne species) are economically important pathogens, especially infesting vegetable crops.

In the tropics and subtropics, Meloidogyne incognita causes an estimated yield loss of 5 to 43% in vegetable crops. In the present study, root-knot nematode disease was surveyed in various vegetable crops in the central plain region of Chhattisgarh State.

Table 2: Annual Flowers (Fall) Resistant: Susceptible: Highly Susceptible: Bugloss (Anchusa capensis); Lupine (Lupinus pubescens); Mexican poppy (Argemone mexicana); Forget-me-not (Mysotis sylvatica); Swanriver daisy (Brachycome iberidifolia); Baby-blue-eyes (Nemophila menziesii); Evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa); Clarkia (Clarkia elegans); Gaillardia (Gaillardia pulchella var.

picta. They found that one advanced bell pepper variety, named ‘RJ(6)A3C,’ was the most resistant to three species of the most common root-knot nematodes – southern, peanut and peach.

UF/IFAS scientists developed this pepper variety by cross-breeding a hot pepper line and a .cause most of the serious problems. Te root-knot. nematodes (Meloidogyne. spp.) are by far the most important. Teir easily-recognized galls in the roots make their presence easy to detect (Fig. 4). Galls result from growth of plant tissues around juvenile nematodes which feed near the center of the root.